Write a narrative essay in which you describe your reaction to a piece of news that you once received—good or bad—that provoked a strong emotional response.

Paper 3

Choose one of the topics listed below.

  1. Write a narrative essay in which you describe your reaction to a piece of news that you once received—good or bad—that provoked a strong emotional response. —Writing prompt based on Suggested Writing Assignment #2 on page 401.
  • Your thesis should be a statement that identifies the news you received and the singular, strong emotional response you had.
  • Your body paragraphs should be composed of action details (starting after you heard the news)—presented in chronological order—that progress your story while proving the strong emotion you felt as stated in your thesis statement.
  • For prewriting, consider the following questions. You won’t necessarily answer these questions in your final paper. And you should not answer these questions as a means of outlining the content of your paper. Try to come up with other questions to help you develop ideas for your paper.

o   What was the very first thing you remember doing after hearing the piece of news?

o   Why did you react to the piece of news the way that you did?

o   Who was around when you first heard the piece of news?

o   What did you do later that day? Had your emotions calmed down any?

  1. Write an essay in which you explain the different types of speech you use in your life.—Writing prompt based on Reflecting on What You Know on page 478.
  • Your thesis should be a statement that identifies what you try to achieve with your speech, regardless of who you are talking to.
  • Your body paragraphs should explore your speech categories, including definitions of your categories and specific examples of conversations you have that fit in those categories. The topic sentences and support should clearly connect to what you try to achieve in your speech as presented in your thesis statement.
  • For prewriting, consider the following questions. You won’t necessarily answer these questions in your final paper. And you should not answer these questions as a means of outlining the content of your paper. Try to come up with other questions to help you develop ideas for your paper.

o   Why do you speak differently to different groups of people (or individuals)?

o   Where do you speak more casually? More formally?

o   What are some of the specific terms/phrases that you interchange depending on who you are talking to?

o   What do you try to accomplish with your speech at all times?

**NOTES**

  1. Write an introduction that is one or two paragraphs long and includes your thesis statement, which you should underline or highlight.
  2. Write at least four body paragraphs with approximately 10 sentences in each body paragraph. Use your own experiences and observations as support—no research should be included in this paper.
  3. Write a conclusion that is one paragraph long and ends your paper quickly. Using different language, restate your thesis; then include a sentence or two that keeps the reader thinking about your thesis.
  4. Write a minimum of 1200 words (maximum of 1400 words).
  5. Avoid using 2nd-person point of view.
  6. Put your name, Paper 3, and your word count on the first three lines. On the next line center your title. On the next line begin your paper.
  7. Paper 3 will be assessed per this assignment sheet and the Paper Rubric.

 

 

 

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