What was the recipe you selected for your final treatment? Describe the reasoning behind your selections of time and temperature.

This lab will require a write-up which highlights your observations and answers some questions where you can apply what you learned from your readings. The instructions and questions are here for your convenience and will also be in the assignment drop box.
The chart for noting your observations and answering the written assignments can be downloaded by clicking on the link.

Materials and Equipment

  • Small steak, about one inch thick (any cut labeled as suitable for grilling will be fine
  • Vegetable oil
  • white sugar (optional)
  • Cast iron (or other heavy) fry pan
  • Instant read thermometer
  • Kitchen timer

Procedure

  1. Cut the steak into 6 equal sized pieces. You may want to trim the steak to size first and/or discard odd shaped scraps.
  2. Sort and arrange the pieces so that you have three samples, each with two chunks, that look as similar as possible.
  3. Follow these directions for your first sample. Very lightly oil the pan and place over low heat for about two minutes (Alternatively the pan could be placed in a preheated 250 degree oven for 10 minutes then returned to the stove. An electric fry pan or griddle would also work). The goal here is to have an approximately 200-250 degree pan.
  4. Place two pieces of meat in the pan and cook undisturbed for 5 minutes then flip and cook another 5 minutes before removing to a plate.
  5. Record your observations on color, size changes, aroma, etc. during cooking on the lab sheet.
  6. Using the instant read thermometer, record the internal temperature of one piece. Cover loosely with foil and set aside.
  7. Cut the other piece in half and observe the interior.
  8. After 10 minutes, remove the foil and cut the first piece in half and observe the interior.
  9. Now we will try the second sample. Very lightly oil the pan, place a 1/4 teaspoon of white sugar in the center and heat over high heat until the sugar just begins to melt. Carefully wipe the sugar out with a dry paper towel.  (Alternatively the pan could be placed in a 350 degree oven for 20 minutes and then returned to the stove or an infrared thermometer could be used to determine when the pan reaches the desired temperature.) The goal here is to have an approximately 320-375 degree pan.
  10. Place two pieces of meat in the pan and cook undisturbed for 3 minutes then flip and cook another 3 minutes before removing to a plate.
  11. Record your observations on color, size changes, aroma, etc. during cooking on the lab sheet.
  12. Using the instant read thermometer, record the internal temperature of one piece. Cover loosely with foil and set aside.
  13. Cut the other piece in half and observe the interior.
  14. After 10 minutes, remove the foil and cut the first piece in half and observe the interior.
  15. Taste a sample of each of the treatments. Record your observations on taste, texture, etc. on lab sheet.
  16. The third ‘recipe’ is up to you! Based on what you learned from the first two samples, decide what temperature and times you will use and proceed to cook the two remaining pieces.
  17. Follow steps 5-8 and 15 for your recipe and record your observations on the lab sheet.

Questions

  1. Estimate the temperature of the pan for your first and second treatments and describe the effects of temperature on the protein, fat, and water of your sample.(do the proteins brown, fat melt, water sizzle?)  Include the name of the cut of steak you used.
  2. What effects did you observe on the relationship between taste, texture, and temperature?
  3. What was the recipe you selected for your final treatment? Describe the reasoning behind your selections of time and temperature.
  4. Please give an example of another type of meat (protein) where the hot and fast cooking technique would be successful and an example where it would not. Explain your choices in terms of protein, fat, and water differences between those of steak and of your examples.
Type of paper Academic level Subject area
Number of pages Paper urgency Cost per page:
 Total: