What was easy for me in planning the lesson? Why?

As an educator, a large portion of learning and growth comes from reflection and refinement.

 

For this week’s journal, use this self-reflection rubric to evaluate the effectiveness of your lesson plan from Week Four. Elaborate on the areas of strength in your lesson plan, as well as those areas in need of improvement. provide an evaluation of at least three of your classmates’ lesson plans that were uploaded to the Doc Sharing Tab last week. Using the rubric, provide justification and an explanation of how you scored their areas of strength and areas in need of improvement.

 

  1. What was easy for me in planning the lesson? Why?

 

  1. What components were difficult for me to complete when planning the lesson? Why?

 

  1. What do I want to improve on when creating lesson plans?

 

  1. How will this assignment help me in my future role?

 

Evaluate 3- peer’s Lesson plans

 

Evaluation of Peer’s Lesson Plan:

 

Strengths:

 

Areas of Reflection:

 

Evaluation of Peer’s Lesson Plan:

 

Strengths:

 

Areas of Reflection

 

 

 

Evaluation of Peer’s Lesson Plan:

 

Strengths:

 

Areas of Reflection

 

This is the three peers lesson plans, Listed below-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1)Lesson Plan Template –1 peer’s Name is Mirna Roman

 

For a more detailed explanation, including examples, of each section within the Lesson Plan Template, please

 

view the Lesson Plan Handbook.

 

Lesson Plan Template – Overview

 

For a more detailed explanation, including examples, of each section within the Lesson Plan Template, please

 

view the Lesson Plan Handbook.

 

Content Area or Developmental Focus:

 

Age/Grade of Children:

 

Length of Lesson:

 

Goal The goal is the purpose of the lesson.

 

Objective The objective is what students will be able to

 

know or do at the end of the lesson.

 

Standards Included

 

Standards are the knowledge or skills that

 

students will be expected to demonstrate.

 

Depending on the age of the children you are

 

working with, you will choose the appropriate

 

standard from the list below:

 

Birth to Age 3: Developmental Milestones.

 

Click HERE to locate a developmental

 

milestone checklist that includes

 

developmental standards.

 

Ages 3 to 5: Early Learning Guidelines.

 

Click HERE to locate the Early Learning

 

Guidelines for your state.

 

Head Start Framework: If you work in a

 

Head Start program, please click HERE to

 

choose a standard from the Head Start Early

 

Learning Framework.

 

K-3: Click HERE to locate the Kindergarten

 

through 3rd grade standards for your state.

 

Materials The materials section lists all items needed

 

throughout a lesson.

 

Introduction

 

The introduction is how you will introduce

 

the activity so your students are interested,

 

engaged, and have the opportunity to think

 

about any background knowledge/experience

 

that they may have.

 

Lesson Development:

 

The lesson development section includes the

 

steps that you will take to teach the lesson

 

including any modeling, direct instruction,

 

centers, etc. that will be utilized. Sometimes

 

this is also referred to as the “procedures”

 

section of the lesson plan.

 

Often times you will have students that you

 

will need to include modifications for when

 

Introduction

 

The introduction is how you will introduce

 

the activity so your students are interested,

 

engaged, and have the opportunity to think

 

about any background knowledge/experience

 

that they may have.

 

Lesson Development:

 

The lesson development section includes the

 

steps that you will take to teach the lesson

 

including any modeling, direct instruction,

 

centers, etc. that will be utilized. Sometimes

 

this is also referred to as the “procedures”

 

section of the lesson plan.

 

Differentiation

 

Often times you will have students that you

 

will need to include modifications for when

 

you are developing a lesson. In this section

 

you will need to explain how you could

 

modify your lesson to meet the needs of the

 

different children you are working with.

 

These modifications may apply to the lesson

 

development section, the practice/check for

 

understanding section, or both.

 

Assessment

 

(Practice/ Checking for

 

Understanding)

 

Students are given the opportunity to apply

 

what they have learned in a formal or

 

informal way. You will need to describe what

 

you will do to assess student learning. It can

 

be through guided practice and/or

 

independent practice. Guided practice allows

 

students to demonstrate their understanding of

 

the material while the teacher is present and

 

can provide needed assistance. Independent

 

practice might be group work, projects, or

 

homework.

 

Closing Here the ECE teacher/provider reviews the

 

highlights of the lesson and brings closure to

 

the activity.

 

Lesson Plan Template

 

Lesson Plan Template

 

Content Area or Developmental Focus: Science: Butterfly Life Cycle

 

Age/Grade of Children: Kindergarten- age 5-6

 

Length of Lesson:45 minutes.

 

Goal

 

To teach the lifecycle of a butterfly.

 

Objective

 

The students will be able to remember the life

 

cycle in stages of a butterfly wising a guided

 

life cycle stage map.

 

Standards Included

 

Developmental Checklist – 4 to 5 years.

 

Arizona’s College and Career Ready

 

Standards-English Language Arts- Speaking

 

and Listening Standards K-2- 1.SL.4-

 

Describe people, places, things and events

 

with relevant details, expressing ideas and

 

To teach the lifecycle of a butterfly.

 

Objective

 

The students will be able to remember the life

 

cycle in stages of a butterfly wising a guided

 

life cycle stage map.

 

Standards Included

 

Developmental Checklist – 4 to 5 years.

 

Arizona’s College and Career Ready

 

Standards-English Language Arts- Speaking

 

and Listening Standards K-2- 1.SL.4-

 

Describe people, places, things and events

 

with relevant details, expressing ideas and

 

feelings clearly (Zaur & Bodamer, 2015).

 

Materials

 

Materials used will be a sheet of the butterfly

 

life cycle for each students (black and white

 

so they can color in.), crayons, visual life

 

color pictures of the life cycle of a butterfly to

 

show students, a short clip on computer of the

 

process of the actual butterfly life cycle.

 

Introduction

 

“Hello class! Today we will be learning about

 

the amazing life cycle of a butterfly.” “Can

 

anybody tell what they know about

 

butterflies?” Waits for response. “Great

 

answers from all of you, I’m going to tell you

 

all about the stages that a butterfly goes

 

through in order to become a butterfly. From

 

how they start being a small little egg to a

 

beautiful flying butterfly. First we will start

 

by showing viewing a small clip of the live

 

process in a butterflies life cycle. Shows class

 

small clip. ”I’m going to pass out a work

 

sheet which shows you the stages in order and

 

you will color the cycle in as we go in order

 

together.” Then show pictures of: Stage 1-

 

Egg , Stage (Larve), 2- Caterpillar (Pupa),

 

Stage 3- Chrysalis (Pupa), Stage 4 – Butterfly.

 

Lesson Development

 

1- Show small clip of butterflies.

 

2-Gives students work sheet of butterfly life

 

cycle and crayons.

 

3- Shows picture to students of the stages in

 

order and talks a little about it while students

 

color in stage.

 

4- Ask the class in whole to repeat stages and

 

compliments students coloring.

 

Differentiation

 

Shows again pictures to each students who

 

needs extra help and help them with the

 

repeating of stages and helps them color by

 

letting them select the colors they prefer.

 

Assessment

 

(Practice/ Checking for

 

1- Show a picture of a certain stage to

 

students and ask them they remember the

 

name of the life cycle along with asking them

 

cycle and crayons.

 

3- Shows picture to students of the stages in

 

order and talks a little about it while students

 

color in stage.

 

4- Ask the class in whole to repeat stages and

 

compliments students coloring.

 

Differentiation

 

Shows again pictures to each students who

 

needs extra help and help them with the

 

repeating of stages and helps them color by

 

letting them select the colors they prefer.

 

Assessment

 

(Practice/ Checking for

 

Understanding)

 

1- Show a picture of a certain stage to

 

students and ask them they remember the

 

name of the life cycle along with asking them

 

if they can remember the life cycle process

 

while pointing at their color picture in order.

 

* I will be able to tell if students have

 

remembered and also check on their verbal

 

communication.

 

Closing

 

Tell students that they have done a great job

 

in their coloring pictures as well as praising

 

their memory skills and that I will be putting

 

their work up on our wall for the week. At the

 

end of the week students can take their work

 

home and show their families their work

 

along with telling them what they have

 

learned about the butterfly life cycle .

 

References

 

Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes. (2014). State-By-State. Retrieved from

 

http://ceelo.org/state-information/state-map/.

 

Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2015). Standards by State. Retrieved from

 

http://www.corestandards.org/standards-in-your-state/

 

Head Start. (2011). Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework.

 

Retrieved from: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching/eecd/Assessment/

 

Child%20Outcomes/HS_Revised_Child_Outcomes_Framework(rev-Sept2011).pdf .

 

National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement. (2014). State/Territory Early

 

Learning Guidelines. Retrieved from https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/

 

state_elgs_web_final.pdf.

 

Office of Child Care (2015). State Early Learning Guidelines. Retrieved from https://

 

childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/resource/state-early-learning-guidelines.

 

The Early Childhood Direction Center. (2006). Developmental Checklists Birth to Five.

 

Retrieved from http://www.preschoollearningcenter.org/images/upload/

 

developmental_checklist.pdf

 

Zaur, J., & Bodamer, K., (2015). Early Childhood and Child Development: Lesson Plan Handbook. San Diego, CA;

 

Bridgepoint Education.

 

The Lifecycle of a Butterfly. (n.d.). Retrieved December 22, 2015, from http://

 

www3.canisius.edu/~grandem/butterflylifecycle/The

 

 

 

Second peer’s name is Lea Six Lesson plan is:

 

Content Area or Developmental Focus:

 

Age/Grade of Children:

 

Length of Lesson:

 

Goal The goal is the purpose of the lesson.

 

Objective The objective is what students will be able to know or do at the end of the

 

lesson.

 

Standards Included Standards are the knowledge or skills that students will be expected to

 

demonstrate. Depending on the age of the children you are working with, you

 

will choose the appropriate standard from the list below:

 

Birth to Age 3: Developmental Milestones. Click HERE to locate a

 

developmental milestone checklist that includes developmental standards.

 

Ages 3 to 5: Early Learning Guidelines. Click HERE to locate the Early

 

Learning Guidelines for your state.

 

Head Start Framework: If you work in a Head Start program, please click

 

HERE to choose a standard from the Head Start Early Learning Framework.

 

K-3: Click HERE to locate the Kindergarten through 3rd grade standards for

 

your state.

 

Materials The materials section lists all items needed throughout a lesson.

 

Introduction The introduction is how you will introduce the activity so your students are

 

interested, engaged, and have the opportunity to think about any background

 

knowledge/experience that they may have.

 

Lesson Development: The lesson development section includes the steps that you will take to teach

 

the lesson including any modeling, direct instruction, centers, etc. that will be

 

utilized. Sometimes this is also referred to as the “procedures” section of the

 

lesson plan.

 

Differentiation Often times you will have students that you will need to include modifications

 

for when you are developing a lesson. In this section you will need to explain

 

how you could modify your lesson to meet the needs of the different children

 

you are working with. These modifications may apply to the lesson

 

development section, the practice/check for understanding section, or both.

 

Assessment

 

(Practice/ Checking for

 

Understanding)

 

Students are given the opportunity to apply what they have learned in a formal

 

or informal way. You will need to describe what you will do to assess student

 

learning. It can be through guided practice and/or independent practice.

 

Guided practice allows students to demonstrate their understanding of the

 

material while the teacher is present and can provide needed assistance.

 

Independent practice might be group work, projects, or homework.

 

Closing Here the ECE teacher/provider reviews the highlights of the lesson and brings

 

closure to the activity.

 

Developed by Kristina Bodamer and Jennifer Zaur, Full-Time Faculty, College of Education, ECE/CD Department

 

Content Area or Developmental Focus: Language and Literacy

 

Age/Grade of Children: Preschool children 3-4 Year

 

Length of Lesson: About 15 to 20 Minutes

 

Goal For children to learn and develop the recognize the different animals. For them

 

to be able to listen to the story and know when it there turn to stand up when

 

its there turn.

 

Objective Is to have the children learn the different animals form the book Brown Bear

 

Brown Bear. They will also learn their listen skill as well.

 

Standards Included Recognizes and identifies almost all common objects and pictures.

 

Strangers can understand most of words.

 

Matches an object in hand or room to a picture in a book

 

Materials

 

Brown Bear Animals added 9-9-02 Submitted by: Kathey Chvostal

 

Before you read the story, place stuffed or paper animals from the story

 

into a bag or a feely box. Have the children pick an animal from the

 

story out. As you read the story have the children stand up when you

 

get to their animal. Have the children say the name of their animal and

 

the sound it makes.

 

Introduction Today we are going to read a book about Brown Bear Brown Bear. We have a

 

box every child will reach in a box and grab just one animal. After all children

 

has one animal we will sit down. LETS BEING BROWN BEAR BROWN

 

BEAR

 

Lesson Development I will have the book so the children can see the what going on. They will have

 

to watch and match there animal. There will be a box so the children will learn

 

the different kinds of animals. They will have to learn to listen so when they

 

hear there animal. I would have them add it to like have them act like the

 

animal. Like if they were a dog they can bark.

 

Differentiation I would have to change it were if a child need help. I would let them know Bob

 

would you stand you animal next. Or have number on the back of the animals.

 

But another thing is have them in order so the go down the line. The last thing

 

I would try is show them the paper before reading it so they can match up the

 

animal. I would say if your animal match the page please stand up.

 

Assessment

 

(Practice/ Checking for

 

Understanding)

 

I would have them the aid read the book. Then I would observe the children

 

and see what they have learn. Then I would have them in a work in a group

 

and have them match the animals. I would have them in different colors and

 

have them work together to match them up. Like a dog with a dog. But have

 

Developed by Kristina Bodamer and Jennifer Zaur, Full-Time Faculty, College of Education, ECE/CD Department

 

two different dogs.

 

Closing We are done with this book. Is there any question do you have? What was you

 

favorite part? What did you like to do next?

 

References

 

Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes. (2014). State-By-State. Retrieved from

 

http://ceelo.org/state-information/state-map/.

 

Common Core State Standards Initiative. (2015). Standards by State. Retrieved from

 

http://www.corestandards.org/standards-in-your-state/

 

Head Start. (2011). Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework. Retrieved

 

from: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/teaching/eecd/Assessment/Child

 

%20Outcomes/HS_Revised_Child_Outcomes_Framework(rev-Sept2011).pdf .

 

National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement. (2014). State/Territory Early Learning

 

Guidelines. Retrieved from

 

https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/state_elgs_web_final.pdf.

 

Office of Child Care (2015). State Early Learning Guidelines. Retrieved from

 

https://childcareta.acf.hhs.gov/resource/state-early-learning-guidelines.

 

The Early Childhood Direction Center. (2006). Developmental Checklists Birth to Five.

 

Retrieved from

 

http://www.preschoollearningcenter.org/images/upload/developmental_checklist.pdf

 

http://www.preschooleducation.com/ctbrownbear.shtml

 

Developed

 

 

 

 

 

Third lesson plan peer’s name is: Sarah Pritchett

 

 

 

 

 

Content Area or Developmental Focus: Sight Words

 

Age/Grade of Children: Four and five-year-old children / Kindergarten

 

Length of Lesson: One Hour

 

Goal

 

 

 

The goal of this lesson is for children to be able to recognize sight words that make up the majority of the words used in beginning children’s books. By recognizing sight words, children will be able to focus more on the meaning of the book rather than having to decode each word. (Piper, 2012)

 

Objective         As a result of this instruction, the students will be able to recognize common sight words used, as well as how to pronounce them and how to put each sight word into a sentence that makes sense.

 

Standards Included

 

 

 

The standards that students will be expected to demonstrate include speaking sentences that contain more than five words. They should be able to produce and expand complete sentences when participating in language activities. (Core Standards, 2015) They should also be able to read common sight word that they probably see all the time in books and stories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Materials

 

 

 

The materials needed for this activity include:

 

-23 popsicle sticks with sight word/smiley faces on them

 

-A plastic container for the popsicle sticks to go into

 

-Students

 

-Teacher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

 

 

 

“Good Morning Class! Today, we are going to practice sight words. Every student will draw a popsicle stick which contains a sight word on it and will read it out loud to the class when it is their turn. There will be three popsicle sticks which contain a smiley face on them. If you draw one of those sticks, you will draw a second popsicle stick out of the container, and make a sentence using that word. If you say the word or sentence correctly, you will put the popsicle stick in the center of the circle, but if you say it incorrectly, it will go back in the container for another child to get a turn to say it correctly.”

 

Lesson Development

 

 

 

 

 

The procedures are as followed:

 

1)         Pick a popsicle stick out of the container.

 

2)         Sit down in our “circle time” spot.

 

3)         Say the word out loud when it is your turn in the circle.

 

4)         If your popsicle stick has a smiley face on it, pick a second popsicle stick, and use that word in a sentence.

 

5)         If you didn’t say the word correctly or didn’t use it correctly in the sentence, put the popsicle stick back in the container. If I tell you that you said it correctly, put the popsicle stick in the middle of the circle, and it will be the next persons turn to say their word.

 

Differentiation            Modifications that I would include if necessary would be to help them sound out the word on their popsicle stick, and they can repeat the word after me. If they have to come up with a sentence, I will help them get started on their sentence and they can finish it themselves.

 

 

 

Assessment

 

(Practice/ Checking for

 

Understanding)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As soon as our activity is over, I will point on random children in the class to say out loud one sight word they learned today that wasn’t the sight word they had on their popsicle stick. This way, I will know who was paying attention and who wasn’t. If there are only a few sight words left when I get to one of the last children, and they can’t think of what was said and what wasn’t, I will have them start over and say a sight word that might have already been said, as long as it’s not theirs.

 

 

 

 

 

Closing

 

 

 

Here, I will go over everything we learned today in our activity. I will then ask the students if they have any questions over anything we went over involving the activity. I will end this activity by telling everyone what a great job they did, and if they are having any problems remembering the sight words, I will tell them a good activity to do at home is make flashcards with their parents with the sight words on them and have their parents go over them with them. That way, they will see them over and over again and be able to recognize them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

 

Core Standards. (2015). English Language Arts Standards. Retrieved from: http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/K/

 

Early Childhood Direction Center. (2006). Developmental Checklists Birth to Five. Retrieved from: http://www.ou.edu/cwtraining/assets/pdf/handouts/2010/Developmental%20Checklists%20from%20syracuse%20university.pdf

 

Piper, T. (2012). Making meaning, making sense: Children’s early language learning. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education.

 

 

 

 

 

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