What could be substituted for them?

Note: Don’t add voice to the presentation put the exact text of your talk in the “Notes” section.

Module 4 – Case

Presentations

Helping Restaurants Fight Obesity

As consumers become increasingly concerned about obesity and health risks associated with nutrition, many seek more information about restaurant foods. American families are estimated to spend as much as half of their food dollars at restaurants and to consume about one third of their calories outside the home.

One U.S. senator is pushing a bill to require chain restaurants to list nutritional information for all menu items. Although this law has not been passed, your city would like to encourage restaurants to offer more nutritious menu choices.

Assume that you work for Partners for a Healthier Community (PHC), which is part of the City Health and Human Services Department. PHC has been working on a program called Healthy Dining. Its goal is to offer food establishments the opportunity to be recognized as Healthy Dining restaurants. In order to be listed, owners must meet certain criteria.

A PHC team devoted to the Healthy Dining program discussed a number of requirements. The team thought that restaurants ought to offer at least two choices of fruits or vegetables. They wanted choices other than potato dishes. The team was much opposed to french fries. What could be substituted for them? Perhaps salads? In regard to the menu, the team thought that Healthy Dining restaurants should have some low-fat and low-calorie menu items, and when they are offered, customers should know what they are. However, no minimum on the number of such items would be required. The team also thought that Healthy Dining restaurants should try to provide at least some dishes in smaller portion sizes or perhaps half portions. Milk was discussed, and team members suggested that restaurants move away from offering whole milk. Team members preferred 1 percent or nonfat milk when milk was offered as a beverage.

The team gave you the task of giving a PowerPoint presentation to restaurant owners who inquired about the Health Dining rating.

(Adapted from Dr. Guffy case studies)

Case Assignment

Create a PowerPoint presentation with audio to be presented to owners who want to know how to earn the Healthy Dining rating for their restaurants. ” Don’t add voice to the presentation put the exact text of your talk in the “Notes” section”.

Address the presentation as a response to Mr. Adrian Hammersmith and guests, Adrian’s Steak House, 974 South Cobb Drive, Marietta, GA 30060. Explain in your presentation that information about the Healthy Dining program can be found at http://www.healthydiningfinder.com. This page is primarily for diners. A link at the bottom of the page, labeled “Nutrition Services,” takes dietitians and restaurateurs to information about program certification and membership.

Note: Put the exact text of your talk in the “Notes” section.

Use the following oral communication rubric to see how your instructor will assess your speech: Oral Communication Rubric

What if You Have Never Created a PowerPoint Presentation?

Click the link If you have never made a PowerPoint presentation before and need to learn how to use the program.
https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Record-and-add-narration-and-timings-to-a-slide-show-3dc85001-efab-4f8a-94bf-afdc5b7c1f0b?CorrelationId=e31b08e8-5f82-4291-9c2b-757190ca0028&ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US

Submit your PowerPoint presentation with narration by the module’s due date. Narration includes the audio recording of your talk and/or the actual text of your talk in the “Notes” section. There is no need to have an actual audience for the presentation.

Assignment Expectations

Create a PowerPoint presentation and upload it. (PowerPoint presentations should not be over 10MB.)
Basic PowerPoint Guidelines
•Don’t use small fonts. The bigger, the better. Small fonts are harder to read on screen.
•Use “sans serif” fonts like Verdana, which was specifically designed to be readable on computer screens.
•Don’t use “serif” fonts like Times New Roman. The bits at the end of each letter tend to blur when projected.
•Don’t write complete sentences on your slides. Write short phrases. You will be less tempted to read the slide word for word.
•Don’t use more than two fonts per slide. More than two creates visual confusion.
•Keep your slides simple. Try to have an average of four lines per slide, one heading and three bullet points.
•Unless you plan to have a totally dark room (which is not a good idea by the way) use white or light-colored backgrounds with black or dark-colored letters. They are much easier to read than white or light letters on dark backgrounds.
•Create a completely black slide for the beginning and end of your presentation. That way while you are waiting to start, you don’t have to show the first slide and at the end you can fade to black and it can stay black as long as you like.
•Don’t use timed slides. Advance your slides manually with the mouse. You may not be able to keep up with the timed slides or an accident may happen that would throw off your timing.
•Talk to your audience, not the screen.
•Avoid walking in between the projector and the screen.
•If at all possible, practice at least once with the actual machine you will be using in your presentation. If you don’t, you may encounter some unpleasant surprises. (At a presentation during my job interview at UOR, I discovered that the projector I had been assured would work with my Mac laptop didn’t.)
•Don’t assume that the data projector will work. Always make back up visual aids (such as black and white overhead projector slides, printed handouts, etc. At that same UOR job presentation, I had brought overhead slides as a backup and used them instead. I got the job.)
•Use “three slides per page” for printing audience handouts. That way your audience has a copy of each slide you have and has some room to the right of each slide to jot down notes.

Your PowerPoint presentation will be reviewed according to the Oral Communication Rubric (above).

Module 4 – Background

Presentations

Required Material

Rogers, P. TeknoSport: Communicating to Prevent Change.

Readings About Presentations and PowerPoint

The Cognitive Load of PowerPoint: Q&A with Richard E. Mayer

In this short article, Cliff Atkinson interviews University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor Richard Mayer about the conclusions one can draw from his extensive research on multimedia for PowerPoint presentations.

Atkinson, C., (2006). The Cognitive Load of PowerPoint: Q&A with Richard E. Mayer.

Atkinson, C., (2006). Five Experts Dispute Edward Tufte on PowerPoint.

Five Ways to Reduce PowerPoint Overload

This PDF download is the real stuff. This article is radical in its approach to PowerPoint. It is also the single best thing I’ve ever read on PowerPoint. It contradicts almost everything you’ve been told about PowerPoint, including much of what is in this module. Most of what is in this module will help you to do very good PowerPoint presentations—presentations much better than most that are given today. But if you want to go beyond that and make PowerPoint presentations that make your audience’s socks roll up and down, then use this approach. It isn’t easy, but the results are great. Personally, the hardest part of this approach for me is finding images that precisely convey what I’m trying to get across. Notice that the authors do what they say in the article. The headings and graphics in the articles are done in the style they recommend, and the text on the bottom is done using the “notes” function in PowerPoint.

Atkinson, C. & Mayer, R. E., (2004). Five Ways to Reduce PowerPoint Overload.

In addition to the Atkinson & Mayer article above the below readings are used in your Case Assignment.

Tufte, E., (2003). PowerPoint Is Evil. Power Corrupts. PowerPoint Corrupts Absolutely. Wired. February 17, 2011, at http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/ppt2.html.

Doumont, J. (2005). The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Slides Are Not All Evil. Technical Communication. Washington: Feb 2005. Vol. 52, Iss. 1; p.64, 7pgs.

In Defense of PowerPoint. Accessed from http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/in_defense_of_powerp.html

Presentation Skills. Accessed from http://homepages.wmich.edu/~bowman/c6dframe.html

Basic PowerPoint Guidelines
•Don’t use small fonts. The bigger, the better. Small fonts are harder to read on screen.
•Use “sans serif” fonts like Verdana, which was specifically designed to be readable on computer screens.
•Don’t use “serif” fonts like Times New Roman. The bits at the end of each letter tend to blur when projected.
•Don’t write complete sentences on your slides. Write short phrases. You will be less tempted to read the slide word for word.
•Don’t use more than two fonts per slide. More than two creates visual confusion.
•Keep your slides simple. Try to have an average of four lines per slide, one heading and three bullet points.
•Unless you plan to have a totally dark room (which is not a good idea by the way) use white or light-colored backgrounds with black or dark-colored letters. They are much easier to read than white or light letters on dark backgrounds.
•Create a completely black slide for the beginning and end of your presentation. That way while you are waiting to start, you don’t have to show the first slide and at the end you can fade to black and it can stay black as long as you like.
•Don’t use timed slides. Advance your slides manually with the mouse. You may not be able to keep up with the timed slides or an accident may happen that would throw off your timing.
•Talk to your audience, not the screen.
•Avoid walking in between the projector and the screen.
•If at all possible, practice at least once with the actual machine you will be using in your presentation. If you don’t, you may encounter some unpleasant surprises. (At a presentation during my job interview at UOR, I discovered that the projector I had been assured would work with my Mac laptop didn’t.)
•Don’t assume that the data projector will work. Always make back up visual aids (such as black and white overhead projector slides, printed handouts, etc. At that same UOR job presentation, I had brought overhead slides as a backup and used them instead. I got the job.)
•Use “three slides per page” for printing audience handouts. That way your audience has a copy of each slide you have and has some room to the right of each slide to jot down notes.
•After you have prepared your presentation, practice it several times. Time your practice presentation.

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