The Relationship between Attractiveness and Employability

Introduction

            It is apparent that attractiveness matters a lot in the present world. Various social psychologists, such as Berggren, Jordahl, & Poutvaara (2010), have spent several years trying to identify the effects of attractiveness on the assessment made by other people. Management studies have also been equally interested in the effects of attractiveness on employability. This is because of the often encounters with issues of attractiveness in circumstances concerning decisions related to employment. Studies have shown that the physical appearances of individuals are tied to their success. Employers seem to acknowledge attractive employees in order to influence the closing of an important deal. Regardless of the physiological or psychological reasons, employers acknowledge that individuals who do not care about their appearance do not show confidence that they can effectively deal with customers. According to Bertrand & Mullainathan (2004), attractive people are viewed to be happier, more sociable, and more successful that individual who are not attractive. In this regard, this paper explains the relationship between attractiveness and employability.

Maryam (2012) pointed out that the benchmarks of attractiveness vary over period within similar cultures. These variations might go past individual fashions and preference in clothing to the aspects of the types of body. As such, there seems to be no worldwide acknowledgement of the standards or benchmarks of individual attractiveness. In defining personal attractiveness and beauty, various culture vary in their perspectives of personality traits, moral values and physical features.  Though it is extremely tempting to believe that individuals judge others based on internal features like integrity, selflessness, intelligence and character, such an alluring view of the nature of human is barely realistic (Berggren, Jordahl, & Poutvaara, 2010).

It is undeniable that individuals, including employers, make conclusions based on external stereotypes, and they frequently form perspectives exclusively based on the past unfairness. In addition, people judge others based on flawed characteristics assigned to them. The assessment of bodily attractiveness, as a significant decision making aspect, is important. According to Bertrand & Mullainathan (2004), it is undeniable that beauty plays a pivotal role in the society. Regardless of being a subject to the beholder, there seems to be a general expectation and understanding of what is physically attractive or beautiful in an individual. Beauty or physical attractiveness influences the choice of employers. Therefore, it forms a substantial part of the preparation and job searching of the individuals seeking employment. According to Maryam (2012), the idea of attractiveness acts as an impediment, which separates the force, if being attractiveness is a necessity.

Traditionally, sales is an occupation perceived to be appropriate for beautiful or physically attractive individuals with necessary skills (Berggren, Jordahl, & Poutvaara, 2010). Nevertheless, if an employer recruits based only on physical appearance, it might turn out to be a bad decision. This is because some attractive or physically attractive people might not have people skills required in sales. Employers can favor beautiful or physically attractive candidates because they show qualities such as success, confidence and happiness. Efficient employers will usually prefer hiring attractive individuals when it is directly linked to profitability.

A survey on the effects of beauty on profitability and employment revealed that plain individuals earned about 5 and 10 per cent less than averagely attractive individuals, who earned 5 per cent less than very attractive individuals (Bertrand & Mullainathan, 2004). Nevertheless, the common affinity to center on physical attractiveness alone has risen. This seems to be overwhelming job suitability or qualification. The selling of products, which beautify in different ways such as unintentional messaging in the face, because of physical attractiveness, appear to have taken the mindset of the youthful people (Berggren, Jordahl, & Poutvaara, 2010). The stress appears to be on the physical appearance of the candidate, rather than any intrinsic qualities, which might be relevant to the job position in question. There is more evidence behind the common thought of what looks beautiful is good. The proof for physical attractiveness setting employees back holds a substantial less truth for many employers (Berggren, Jordahl, & Poutvaara, 2010).

According to Bertrand & Mullainathan (2004), it is evident that the physical appearance of an individual can be easily identified, and it is noticeable to other people in social environment. Maryam (2012) pointed out that physical appearance exerts a positive effect on the behaviors and attitudes of the observers. This effect is referred to as the attractiveness halo. Many interviewers face the problem halo effect, which threatens the reliability, fairness, and reliability of the hiring and interviewing activity.

In the accounting for acumen, the feelings of an individual of self-worth are improved by how beautiful or attractive they are. This leads to a higher pay, and more frequent and attractive jobs. Nevertheless, attractiveness is significant to the success of an individual in terms of career. According to Berggren, Jordahl, & Poutvaara (2010), attractiveness as a key to success is a traditional and contemporary myth that is spread by the beauty industry and societal pressures.

In conclusion, management studies have been equally interested in the effects of attractiveness on employability. This is because of the often rows with attractiveness in circumstances concerning decisions related to employment. The benchmarks of attractiveness vary over period within similar cultures. These variations might go past individual fashions and preference in clothing to the aspects of the types of body. It is undeniable that individuals, including employers, make conclusions based on external stereotypes, and they frequently form perspectives exclusively based on the past unfairness. Physical appearance of an individual can be easily identified, and it is noticeable to other people in social environment. As such, this paper concludes that there is a strong relationship between physical appearance and employability.

 

References

Berggren, N., Jordahl, H., & Poutvaara, P. (2010). The looks of a winner: Beauty and electoral success. Journal of Public Economics , 94, 8-15.

Bertrand, M., & Mullainathan, S. (2004). Are emily and greg more employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A field experiment on labor market discrimination. American Economic Review , 94 (4), 991-1013.

Maryam, H. (2012). Attractiveness and Employability: A Viewpoint. Retrieved May 24, 2013, from Dreams: http://dreamspublication.org/en/b-log/item/attractiveness-and-employability-a-viewpoint

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