Invasion of Privacy, and Misrepresentation

 Invasion of Privacy, and Misrepresentation 

On July 27, 1996, a bomb went off at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta,  Georgia at the Summer Olympics. Security guard Richard Jewell had  observed and reported the bomb. He subsequently became the prime suspect  in the case which was widely reported internationally. Jewell was later  exonerated after a serial bomber named Eric Rudolph, who was  responsible for several bombings over multiple states, was arrested and  charged. Jewell subsequently sued the Atlanta Journal-Constitution  newspaper, and his former employer, Piedmont College. He settled a suit  with CNN for an undisclosed amount of money. Jewell considered filing  suit against the FBI but declined, believing it would be futile. This  situation has resulted in a greater concern over how people are  identified when they may, or may not, be material to a criminal  investigation.  Based on this situation as a historical backdrop, research a minimum of  two scholarly and/or credible sources on another investigation where an  individual is not identified as a suspect but, rather, by another term  such as “a person of interest” by law enforcement. Analyze how the  chosen situation was handled differently from the Jewell case and what,  if any, influence the Jewell case may have had on the handling chosen  situation. Analyze legal policies and Constitutional mandates that  pertain to privacy rights. Explain the responsibility law enforcement  personnel have in protecting privacy rights while doing their jobs.  Evaluate ethical issues as they pertain to law enforcement agency  operations, in this case specifically to the identification of suspects  in the media. Provide an example of how criminal events may be “tried in  the court of public opinion” due to the media coverage. Suggest a  remedy for how this can be mitigated.

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