How do the ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ judges adapt their spoken language when at work?

How do the ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ judges adapt their spoken language when at work?

Consider:

-The use of spoken language features and how these have been used to entertain 

-Public attitudes and responses to the judges

Strictly facts:

11 series

11.5 million average viewing figures, more than X-Factor

Presenters: Bruce Forsyth and Tess Daly

Judges: Bruno Tonioli, Craig Revel-Horwood, Darcey Bussell, Len Goodman

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32EKZrK5ndM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbm6DWuMMww

Make notes on their paralinguistic idiosyncratic features and comment on why these work

Plan:

Introduction: Explain the format of the show, use the facts to support, introduce why the judges are so integral to the show’s success with the public and how spoken language makes them successful at their jobs. Explain what this essay will look at.

 

Len Goodman (head judge) study

Consider use of spoken language and idiosyncratic behaviour, and how it changes between the two dances. Comment on how the audience respond to what is being said

Darcey Bussell study

Consider use of spoken language and idiosyncratic behaviour, and how it changes between the two dances. Comment on how the audience respond to what is being said

 

Craig Revel-Horwood Study

Consider use of spoken language and idiosyncratic behaviour, and how it changes between the two dances. Comment on how the audience respond to what is being said

 

Bruno Tonioli

Consider use of spoken language and idiosyncratic behaviour, and how it changes between the two dances. Comment on how the audience respond to what is being said

 

Conclusion

Consider the question, comment on the relations between the judges and the show’s chemistry. Who is the best judge and why?

Transcript 1: Abbey Clancy and Aliajz’s Charleston feedback

 

Daly: Craig, has she done enough to get to Blackpool?

Revel-Horwood: I think she has, absolutely. That was (3) I love the stylisation. The enormous attention to detail was INCREDIBLE in that dance routine (.) I loved the singe pated hop, pull back slides that you did which are so difficult that fantastic troch and step at the end (.) You did not Charleston quietly thank goodness. It was loud, my darling and it (.) was (.) rowed

Daly:  [to Abbey and Aljaz] you enjoyed that didn’t you? You enjoyed yourselves. Darcy, did you enjoy it?

Bussell: I just loved the gorgeously mad side of Abbey this is brilliant to show us this (.) I loved it (.) and it’s so unusual how what ease you did with that prop (.) to have a hat when you are not a performer and to be able to do all those things with that hat was brilliant and it was the leg action it was fast and furious and that monkey step at the end (.) great (.) I really enjoyed that because you got the hands in because it was very fast but (.) well done Aljaz you have made a true dancer out of Abbey

Daly: A true dancer. Has she come back fighting, Len?

Goodman: Well it was a Charleston (.) it was goin back to the twenties (1) Downton Abbey (2) Abbey and Aljaz I tell you what that is A A (.) and I tell you what you don’t need the AA (.) that didn’t break down at all (.) that was a beautiful journey and I tell you what (.) stay in that car (.) get up the M1 and I will see you next week in Blackpool

Daly: All the way to Blackpool (.) come on! Bruno?

Tonioli: Oh yes I couldn’t agree more. It was Abbey the IT girl with a HUGE HIT in her hands (.) you combine the elude of Louise Brookes and the vivacity of Liza Minnelli but what I really liked and Craig is absolutely right (.) it was a Charleston but it had a Bob Fosse influence (.) it has wonderful stylistic little touches that I found very unusual and very very exciting (.) and I God you really deserve to come to Blackpool because this was wonderful

 

 

 

Transcript 2: Mark and Iveta’s Cha Cha Cha feedback

 

Forsyth: Right Craig (1) I can see by the judges (1) enjoyed that (.) what did you think?

Revel-Horwood: Well I have to say I can’t believe the audience (5) They give you a false sense of security, darling (1) it was all very flat footed and stompy (2) the cha cha cha that actually did was danced I am afraid very badly

Forsyth: [at audience] I don’t know how they can say that //

Bussell: // I disagree I disagree (.) I thought it was BRILLIANT (2) I had bum and leg action (.) I didn’t know you had it in you (.) it was great (.) and you have worked REALLY hard on those details (1) every little look (.) ah (.) fabulous (.) just brilliant (.) loved it

Forsyth: Len, what did you think?

Goodman: I tell you what you’re full of talent (.) I won’t tell you what Craig’s full of be (2) LISTEN (.) I tell you what you had down there you had so many basic steps New York, Times steps, Cuban brakes, you did a fan and a hockey stick (1) I tell you what (.) Mark (.) do it again

Forsyth: It was so beautiful it was so beautiful (.) Bruno //

Tonioli: // Oh yeah (.) MC Mark is going for the gold or was it brass I am not quite sure but you had plenty of bling I tell you. It was unique it was different it was memorable and very very funny

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terminology

 

Paralinguistic- non-verbal movements

Idiosyncratic- behaviour that is individual to the person

Idiolect- words that are individual to the person

Informal language/slang

Lack of grammatical words

Tone- voice indicates the mood

Pauses

False starts/hesitations

Interruptions

Emphasis on words Repetition

Humour

Standard English (Craig)

 

Overt prestige (OTT standard English)

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