Discuss some of the ethical considerations that you think are important in the case, and argue for a specific opinion on the case.

 

: Employee privacy and freedom—topic of presentation

 

 

 

Together with your partner(s), you will be giving a class presentation of 10-15 minutes in length.  Each group will choose a real-life case (or a few related cases along a single theme) relevant to the business ethics topic you have been assigned.  The case does not have to be a court case, although it may be.  It simply needs to be a real-life situation to which you can apply the ethical concepts and principles we are learning about.  You should have at least one article on the case you have chosen (usually a Web search will turn up newspaper and magazine articles on subjects of interest).  It does not have to be a recent case, though that tends to add interest.  Try to choose a case for which you can find enough information to present relevant details to the class.  It cannot be a case you were assigned for a class discussion day, nor can it be a case from our textbook. 

 

 

On the day of your presentation, you must turn in the attached form (see the end of this document).

 

1) A summary of the case.

Summarize the important points of the case for the class.  You should assume that the class is not familiar with the case.  Provide enough information that you, and the class, will be able to make informed ethical judgments about the case.

 

2) A viewpoint on the case: one possible ethical position that a reasonable, informed person might argue in relation to the case.

Discuss some of the ethical considerations that you think are important in the case, and argue for a specific opinion on the case.  This does not have to be your own personal position; it just has to be one that you can present an argument for.  You may be playing devil’s advocate for a position you do not actually agree with.  Ideally, you should relate some of the class readings or concepts to your analysis.  For instance, you could use an author’s viewpoint to support your case, or explain how certain ethical concepts are relevant to the case.

 

3) An opposing viewpoint: another, differing position that a reasonable, informed person might argue in relation to the case.

            Same as above, except that it should be an opinion that differs from the first.  It does not have to be an “opposite” opinion, just one that differs in at least some significant ways.  For instance, both might agree that someone did something unethical, but might disagree about why it was unethical, or whether multiple people or a single person was to blame.

 

4) Class discussion.

You should lead the class in a short discussion of the case.  This will involve preparing some interesting questions to pose to the class about the ethics of the case.

 

You may use any (or none) of the classroom technology for your presentation (e.g. the computer, visualizer, DVD player, etc.).  How you decide to format the presentation is up to you.

 

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