Components of prejudice- How do these variables support or tie into Allport’s role of religion in being paradoxical?

Maureen Groome

1 posts
Re:Module 4 DQ 2
Gordon Alport (cited in Ryckman, 2013) claims that common traits are categories for classifying groups of people on a particular aspect. Such generalized dispositions are of limited use in the science of personality. Alport focused on the idea of personal dispositions being unique characteristics of a person, not something that is shared with others. His belief was that common traits were broad categories that people are forced into, but that personal dispositions are a more accurate reflection of an individual’s own specific personality.
In the area of emotional intelligence (EI), with regards to dispositions, Mavroveli, Petrides, Sangareau, and Furnham (2009) state that the trait of EI is in the group of emotion-related self-perceptions and dispositions that are located in the lower levels of personality hierarchies on the five factor personality dimensions (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness). Petrides, Pérez-González, and Furnham (2007) stated that individuals with high EI dispositions are aware of their feelings and are able to regulate them making them less likely to ruminate, more likely to have life satisfaction, and are more likely to use adapting coping styles.
Maureen
Mavroveli, S., Petrides, K. V., Sangareau, Y., & Furnham, A. (2009). Exploring the relationships between trait emotional intelligence and objective socio-emotional outcomes in childhood. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 79(2), 259-272.
Petrides, K. V., Pérez-González, J. C., & Furnham, A. (2007). On the criterion and incremental validity of trait emotional intelligence. Cognition & Emotion, 21(1), 26-55. doi:10.1080/02699930601038912
Ryckman, R. M. (2013). Theories of Personality (10th ed.). Mason, Ohio: Cengage Learning.

Nancy Walker

3 posts
Components of prejudice- How do these variables support or tie into Allport’s role of religion in being paradoxical?
Hi ALL,

Three components of prejudice are:

1. Cognitive
Stereotype: set of beliefs about the characteristics of people in a group generalized to all group members
2. Affective (feelings associated with objects of prejudice)
3. Behavioral
Discrimination: negative behaviors directed at members of a group

How do these variables support or tie into Allport’s role of religion in being paradoxical?

Thanks,

Dr. N

Huesmann, L.R., (1998). The role of social information processing and cognitive schemas in the acquisition and maintenance of habitual aggressive behavior. In R.G. Greeen & E. Donnerstein,

Brian Cicero

2 posts
Re:Module 4 DQ 1
Trait theories are a notable contrast to the psychoanalytic perspective. What is the most significant difference between trait theories and traditional psychoanalytic theories in explaining the development of abnormal behavior? Why?
Trait theories are focused on how individual’s behavioral traits differ, whereas the psychoanalytic methods provides a one and done approach to personality. Because the
trait theory focuses on the individual, it is therefore possible to look at the development of abnormal behavior. Social and developmental psychology have studied implicit theories, which are beliefs that one’s potential change personal characteristics (Schleider, Abel, & Weisz, 2015). The researchers also suggest that maladaptive conditions, especially in the form of environmental stressors are central to the development of abnormal behavior. It is also important to note that they also believe that if the students believe that their personality trait is malleable they may be able to actively improve their outcomes, however they must first have a sense of self-efficacy. The biggest difference between trait and traditional psychoanalytic theories is that those who believe in trait theories believe that each individual has their own set of personality traits, and therefore it is important to look at many things to determine the cause of the development of the abnormal behavior. On the other hand, psychoanalytic theories would indicate that if a person had an abnormal behavior, that the behavior was caused by the same thing for everyone.
References
Schleider, J. L., Abel, M. R., & Weisz, J. R. (2015). Implicit theories and youth mental health problems: A random-effects meta-analysis. Clincal Psychology Review, 35(1), 1-9.

Maren Alitagtag

1 posts
Re:Module 4 DQ 1
Trait theories are a notable contrast to the psychoanalytic perspective. What is the most significant difference between trait theories and traditional psychoanalytic theories in explaining the development of abnormal behavior? Why?
One of the most interesting things for me in the readings in our text this week was the idea of how Cattell looked at a behavioral response as the sum of a person’s personality and the confrontation of a particular situation, or R=f(S,P) (Ryckman, 2013). I find that this thinking is quite different from looking at the experiences that psychoanalysts consider in order to define personality, but instead focusing on quantifiable data on personality traits. A lot of trait theory research is done on twins, which can be helpful because of the genetic matching DNA, therefore giving clues into the heredity of certain traits. I read a very interesting study that showed some genetic components of creativity in twins, and it made me wonder even more about how much of our personality is based upon heredity (Kandler, 2016). My oldest brothers happen to be identical twins, and while their DNA is the same and they share some similar personality characteristics, I have seen significant differences as well. This is something that I continue to be interested in, and hope to learn more about as I look into the behavior of people. Personally, I like the trait theory approach, but I am willing to admit that no one theory seems to have cornered the information on human behavior.
Kandler, C., Riemann, R., Angleitner, A., Spinath, F. M., Borkenau, P., & Penke, L. (2016). The nature of creativity: The roles of genetic factors, personality traits, cognitive abilities, and environmental sources. Journal Of Personality And Social Psychology, 111(2), 230-249. doi:10.1037/pspp0000087
Ryckman, R. M. (2013). Theories of Personality (10th ed.). Mason, Ohio: Cengage Learning.

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