Brief paragraph describing the source, evaluating its strengths and weaknesses, and describing how it will be useful to you in making your argument.

Based on your Exploration Research topic titled: Problems Causing Obese,compile an annotated bibliography of atleast 7 sources minimum(comprising 4 scholarly and professional journals,1 book, 1 World Wide Web and 1 Newspaper)to back up your argument.

An annotated bibliography is a brief report on your research. Each entry in the bibliography has two parts:

1. A complete bibliographical citation of the source.

2. The annotation: a brief paragraph describing the source, evaluating its strengths and weaknesses, and describing how it will be useful to you in making your argument.

Kinds of Sources: Sources should be evaluated according to several criteria:

1.Are they reliable?
2.Are they up to date?
3.How easy are they to get and read?
4.What kinds of evidence are they likely to contain?
5.Will they refer a reader to other useful sources?

Books: Books will generally be written by experts in their field, or at least by authors who have spent a lot of time studying the topic. Authors of books may well push a particular bias or point of view, but they are likely to at least recognize other points of view. Books are, of course, often quite long; for college paper topics, you should generally not have to read entire books. Indeed, if there is an entire book on your topic, your topic is too big to deal with well in even a fairly long paper. More often, when using books, you will only be refering to parts of the book. Look for books on the larger topics within which your topic is a more specific one. Books can be good sources for the history of a problem, which they may summarize in an opening chapter. Books also generally have extensive bibliographies which might direct you to other useful sources. In addition to their length (and because of it), books have the added disadvantage of being generally at least a year out of date, due to the length of time it takes to write a book and get it published.

Scholarly and Professional Journals: Like books, articles in these specialized periodicals will be written by experts in the field whose work has been judged to be worthy by their peers. Such articles will be shorter than books, more narrowly focused, and often more up to date. They will also provide useful bibliographies and perhaps a condensed overview of the issues they address. The only disadvantages of journal articles are that they will be somewhat out of date (it generally takes several months at least for a journal article to be published) and possibly more challenging to read. As someone who is developing expertise in this field yourself, however, you must consult the experts directly, and this is the way to do it.

Magazines: Magazines are periodicals that are published for the general public, usually in order to make money for their publishers. Examples include Time, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, etc. Magazine articles are generally written by journalists without specialized training or expertise in a particular field, though they may quote or interview experts in the field. Because their audience is non-experts, magazine articles can be good places to begin learning about a topic, but they will generally not give you the sort of complex analysis and detail experts (like yourself) really command. For this reason too, magazines generally don’t cite sources or provide bibliographies. The main advantages of magazines are that they are easy to read (though this also reflects the limitation of their authors’ and audiences’ expertise) and that they tend to be pretty current: the popular news magazines are published every week.

Newspapers: Newspapers have the same advantages and disadvantages as magazine articles. The main difference is that newspapers come out everyday and are thus one of the most current sources of information. Note that newspaper publish many different kinds of articles: reporting on the day’s events, longer feature articles which examine an issue over a longer period of time, and opinion/editorial writing in which authors (often experts in their fields) take stands on controversial issues.

The World Wide Web: The Web is very easy to access, but must be used with caution. Remember that there are no librarians or editors on the Web to help verify the quality of what is posted there. While there is an increasing volume of good information on the Web, it is up to you to determine whether what you are looking at is credible and complete. YOU SHOULD NEVER DO ALL OF YOUR RESEARCH FOR ANY PAPER ON THE INTERNET. ALWAYS CONSULT LIBRARY SOURCES.

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