Are the intrinsic or extrinsic factors more lacking as mediators and moderators when an individual succumbs to a charlatan’s ruse? Why?

Alice Benningfield 

 

1 posts

Re:Module 4 DQ 1

There are both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence decisions. Are the intrinsic or extrinsic factors more lacking as mediators and moderators when an individual succumbs to a charlatan’s ruse? Why?

 

The main difference between the extrinsic and the intrinsic motivation lies in the entirety of the person doing it. Intrinsic motivation is done to satisfy an individual’s sense of satisfaction on pleasure. An individual will be oriented to come up with something that they find fulfilling or they enjoy doing, while extrinsic motivation originates from external influences in life (Morgan, Dill, & Kalleberg, 2013). Research has shown that emotion, which is one of the intrinsic factors have played a major role in decision making (Morgan et al., 2013).  When an individual is faced with a dilemma the intrinsic motivational factors play a major role in determining the outcome of the decision.  However in some cases, the external factors may overwhelm the entire decision-making process especially when the external factors have a much greater effect than the internal effects (Morgan et al., 2013). According to Morgan el al. (2013), as much as the external factors, which come from the environment affect the decision making, the intrinsic factors may override the most important decisions.

 

The reasons why an individual may succumb to a charlatan’s ruse is a tricky question for me.  I believe we allow our emotions to take over, which are intrinsic because we want to believe it is true. So I am going to say intrinsic factors are more lacking as mediators and moderators.  However, I can also see how extrinsic factors play a role as well, such as “everyone is doing it” or “it worked for all these people so it must be true”.

 

Morgan, J. C., Dill, J., & Kalleberg, A. L. (2013). The quality of healthcare jobs: Can intrinsic rewards compensate for low extrinsic rewards? Work, Employment and Society27(5), 802-822. DOI: 10.1177/0950017012474707

Danielle Davis 

 

1 posts

Re:Module 4 DQ 1

There are both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence decisions. Are the intrinsic or extrinsic factors more lacking as mediators and moderators when an individual succumbs to a charlatan’s ruse? Why?

 

According to Cherry (2016), psychologists have defined multiple ways of considering why we do the things that we do; and what it is that drives our behavior.  One such method involves exploring whether individual motivation arises from outside influences (extrinsic), or inside influences (intrinsic) (Hergenhahn & Henley, 2014).

 

Extrinsic motivation occurs when we are motivated to perform, or engage in activities that will allow us to earn a reward or avoid some form of punishment (Cherry, 2016). Participating in sports to gain an award; studying hard so that you earn a good grade; or even, utilizing a stores coupons in order to save you money; are some examples of extrinsic motivation.

 

Intrinsic motivation on the other hand, seeks to define your motivationally charged behavior as arising from an internal reward (Hergenhahn & Henley, 2014).  You engage in behavior for its own sake, not to necessarily gain a reward.  Playing games because you find them exciting; or playing sports simply because you find it fun, are ways to demonstrate intrinsic motivation.

 

With that background in play, the question asks to judge if intrinsic or extrinsic factors are more lacking as mediators and moderators when an individual succumbs to a charlatan’s ruse.  When I consider both influences, I believe that the main variance between the two is illustrated by the fact that behaviors that are intrinsically motivated stem from personal self-concepts, beliefs, and attitudes (Thompson, 2014); thus, if one succumbs to a charlatan’s ruse, it could be due to something that is lacking internally (perhaps you have a poor self-concept, for example).

 

With that being said, I can’t help but wonder; however, if perhaps the charlatan can seduce an individual with an external reward, prompting interest and maybe even participation in something they had no initial interest in.  Case in point, I have a friend who called me last month, with a sudden interest in flipping houses (this is the same person who utilized a hammer to open, and break, a bottle of ketchup because they couldn’t get the top off). When I kept asking about this epiphany of being a real estate mogul, she promptly tells me how she met this guy at a showcase, who told her how easy it would be; she could make thousands- no hundreds of thousands of dollars; etc. The only thing that she had to do was give him $99.00 for his proven method; which she did. Now, I am not sure if that truly constitutes what I am trying to get across, but, I am just wondering if perhaps a master manipulator can get into your internal by way of your external.

 

Danielle

 

REFERENCES:

 

Cherry, K. (2016). Differences between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation. Retrieved from https://www.verywell.com/differences-between-extrinsic-and-intrinsic-motivation-2795384.

 

Hergenhahn, B. R., & Henley, T. B. (2014). An introduction to the history of psychology (7th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

 

Thompson, N. (2014). The difference between intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation. Retrieved from http://www.livestrong.com.

 

 

 

Type of paper Academic level Subject area
Number of pages Paper urgency Cost per page:
 Total: